Health Benefits in Nature

We all love being outdoors, especially somewhere as peaceful and beautiful as Springbrook! Often our best memories are in a forest or at a seashore, or just being outside, so it's no surprise that there are also significant health and wellness benefits to enjoying nature.

Springbrook Nature Center offers 3 miles of hiking trails, several benches along the way, lookout areas and even a Meditation Garden. Enjoy both quiet time in nature and mild exercise - everything you need to re-energize.

Here are a few scientifically-measured health benefits from being one with nature:
  • Children scored better than usual with their attention span after being outside. Nature is a proven coping tool for ADD & ADHD - the greener the setting, the less severe their symptoms.
  • Playing in nature settings enhances social, cognitive, emotional and physical development of children.
  • Being outdoors alleviates symptoms of anxiety, depression and psychosomatic illness (including irritability, insomnia, tension, headaches and indigestion).
  • Higher amounts of exposure to natural environments achieve lower levels of general stress; reduction in muscle tension and skin conductance; and improves ability to recover from stressful episodes.
  • It also enhances and speeds recovery from surgery and diseases.
  • A natural environment reduces psychosis and substance abuse. Increased levels of time in nature also leads to a reduction in heart disease risk factors, increased immunity function and reduced resting heart rate.
  • It improves feelings of peace, self-awareness, self-esteem, connectedness, and positively affects mood state by reducing negative feelings including anger, fear, anxiety and frustration.
  • Neighborhood based nature activities promote a sense of community, sense of place, enhance social ties and improves quality of life. It also restores capacity for concentration and attention.
  • Nature provides a place for reflection and clarification of personal values.
Read also, Nature That Nurtures, Hospital gardens turn out to have medical benefits, Deborah Franklin, Scientific American, March 2012, p24-25.